How to study without writing too many essays


You’re a student – you have a life (sort of!). Writing practice essays is the best form of study but you don’t have a lot of time.

How do you learn the content, understand the concepts, and be able to prove it to the marker; while studying for three other exams and spending long periods staring out the window?

Just write the plan.

Take one of the topics that you have worked out could come up, and write an essay question for it. Look at previous exam papers for the general format of the questions that may come up. Then plan how you would answer it. You can use a pretty mind map if you like.

Introduction: The most important part of the essay, it is a good idea to write this out in full (or close to it).

Body paragraphs: Write the topics sentences for the first and last lines of your paragraphs. Fill up the middle with bullet points of what you are going to cover, and refer to the evidence that you will reference to back up your points.

Conclusion: You can either write this in full or follow the same format as for the body paragraphs. Practice writing clear concise sentences that sum up your arguments.

Next week I’ll post an example essay plan.

This method allows you to formulate arguments quickly for possible essay questions; but make sure you write a few timed essays too. It is always good to have a dress rehearsal before the big performance.

Study hard!

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  1. #1 by jlawry on October 26, 2010 - 9:44 pm

    Yes, writing a bullet point essay plan under time pressure is a study method that I have found very useful when studying for exam essays. It definitely saves time compared to writing a whole essay. As an effective “in-between” strategy, I sometimes write one paragraph in full after doing my essay plan. This is also fairly quick, but I’m forced to think about my written expression to a greater extent than when writing a plan only.

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